Tag Archives: Wayne Lee Gay

Crazy for Carmen

by Suzanne Calvin

It marked her American debut so the pressure was on, but French mezzo-soprano–in two performances last weekend–showed herself more than capable of handling the heat, and generating a few extra gigawatts herself. The reviews are pouring in, including this one from Olin Chism of KERA’s “Art & Seek” who called Sunday’s matinee “a magnificent hello […]

How the Destruction of Bizet’s Paris Led to His Greatest Creation

by Wayne Lee Gay

The years immediately preceding the composition of Carmen brought unprecedented disaster to France, and, especially, to Paris. Emperor Napoleon III’s ill-advised provocation of the Franco-Prussian War in 1870 resulted in quick humiliation on the battlefield, followed by the emperor’s abdication and the German siege of Paris—during which, faced with starvation, the citizenry was reduced to […]

Places to Go and Things to Do

by Suzanne Calvin

Liz Johnstone at D magazine serves up a reminder that tonight marks one of the few remaining performances of THE ASPERN PAPERS, which has critics grasping for superlatives. She writes: “In a crumbling house on Lake Como, an aging opera diva and her niece live in relative seclusion until their solitude is interrupted by a […]

Kinda Nice to be Noticed

by Suzanne Calvin

Actually, it’s very nice that classical music writer/critic Wayne Lee Gay at D Magazine’s “Front Row” blog took special notice of the adventurous 2013-2014 Season announced just last month at an event at Cowboys Stadium. Read his take on it here. (Photo of  composer/inventor Tod Machover courtesy of CSMonitor.com) Suzanne Calvin, Manager/Director Media and PR

The Last of the Great Italian Operas

by Wayne Lee Gay

Audience members in Milan, Italy, attending the world premiere of Turandot on the evening of April 25, 1926, knew full well they were viewing the end of one composer’s output; Puccini had been laid to rest some seventeen months earlier with the sort of pomp and national outpouring reserved in Italy for her greatest composers. […]

AIDA – The First Wave

by Suzanne Calvin

The first reviews are out, regarding the Dallas Opera’s spectacular season opener: Verdi’s AIDA with soprano Latonia Moore in the title role. Wayne Lee Gay of D Magazine’s “FrontRow” blog wrote that Miss Moore “simply astounded with a voice that was equally powerful–and clearly capable of subtle effect–from top to bottom.” Read more of Wayne’s […]

CALL HIM ISMAIL: THE MAN OPERA FORGOT

by Megan Meister

“We are now part of Europe,” stated Ismail the Magnificent, Khedive of Egypt, as he maneuvered his ancient kingdom through the maze of international politics during the 1860s and 1870s. To back up his otherwise incorrect claim, he founded a modern postal system, instituted an expansionist military policy, built an enviable railway system, and oversaw […]

UNSCIENTIFIC AMERICAN

by Suzanne Calvin

In this star-spangled month of July, the question that comes to mind is “What are the defining characteristics of an American Opera?”  Should it be opera on identifiable American themes?  Operas merely set in one of the fifty states?  Or exhibiting a particularly American musical idiom?  Operas composed by men and women who claimed the […]

Playing Catch Up – TDO Reviews

by Suzanne Calvin

Yes, it’s been a busy week in these parts — and liable to become busier still with this weekend’s opera party for approximately 32,000 of our friends. That’s my excuse, anyway, for just now posting the latest reviews of the two blockbuster productions being presented by the Dallas Opera. Of THE MAGIC FLUTE, which opened […]

The Critics Weigh-In on LA TRAVIATA

by Suzanne Calvin

Gregory Sullivan Isaacs of “Theater Jones” calls it “an evocative, moody production of one of the most beautiful operas ever written, performed with a consistent degree of musical excellence that few other opera houses could match.” Read Gregory’s review here. But I regret to report that not everyone was quite so enchanted with the opening performance […]