You’re Invited – Tonight!

by Suzanne Calvin

What’s so controversial about Arts Education? Mmmmm. Just about everything: Who funds it? Who needs it? Who gets it? Join Dallas Opera General Director and CEO Keith Cerny, D magazine Arts Editor Peter Simek, and an outstanding panel to discuss the future of education in the arts in America.

More here from Liz Johnstone of D Magazine. Show up at the Winspear, tonight at 6:30 for the “General Director’s Roundtable” and we’ll seat you -- should be a lively conversation!

Suzanne Calvin, Manager/Director Media and PR

25K – And Still Counting (Have you Reserved Your Seats?)

by Suzanne Calvin

Time is running out to reserve your seat or seats for the Dallas Opera’s April 28th Cowboys Stadium simulcast, presented by The Dallas Foundation. However, the hot news of the day is that 25,000 of you have already signed up for tickets to attend the Saturday evening performance -- live from the Winspear Opera House (a ways down Interstate 30 from Arlington).
The media reacts: COMMANDOpera, “The Dallas Morning News,” D Magazine’s Front Row blog, Pegasus News, Broadway World and NBC DFW leading the parade.

You’ve reserved your seats already, right?  If not, go here: http://dallasopera.org/season/2011-2012/magic-flute/cowboys/

(Original photo-now cleverly doctored-by Richard Krall)

UPDATE: Reaction still pouring in, here’s the take from “Theater Jones.”

Suzanne Calvin, Manager/Director Media & PR

Simulcast Ticket Requests Top 25K!

by Suzanne Calvin

If I said, “but who’s counting?” the answer would be -- we are! Yes, indeed, we are. Keep scrolling; the latest on the April 28th simulcast can be found below.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:
Tuesday, March 27, 2012
Contact: Suzanne Calvin (214.443.1014/suzanne.calvin@dallasopera.org)
Or Megan Meister (214.443.1071/megan.meister@dallasopera.org)

REQUESTS FOR TICKETS TO THE DALLAS OPERA COWBOYS STADIUM ONE-NIGHT-ONLY SIMULCAST TOP
25,000!
~~~~
PRESENTED BY THE DALLAS FOUNDATION
~~~~
MOZART’S THE MAGIC FLUTE LIVE!
SATURDAY, APRIL 28, 2012 at 7:30 PM
STADIUM DOORS OPEN AT 6:00 PM
~~~~
FREE SEATING, FREE PARKING, PAID CONCESSIONS
FREE TICKETS AVAILABLE THROUGH TDO WEBSITE
DALLASOPERA.ORG/COWBOYS

DALLAS, TX, MARCH 27, 2012 – The Dallas Opera, in partnership with Cowboys Stadium, is delighted to announce that more than 25,000 tickets to the Dallas Opera’s one-night-only April 28th Cowboys Stadium Simulcast, presented by The Dallas Foundation, have been requested by opera lovers from throughout Texas and 26 additional states. Ticket requests have also come in from the District of Columbia and Canada since the joint announcement was made on January 26th at Cowboys Stadium in Arlington, Texas.
These numbers indicate that the groundbreaking North Texas simulcast may become one of the best attended opera performances in U.S. history.
Additional data collected from those making ticket requests indicate that, as of today (March 27, 2012), 93% of participating households have no previous purchasing history with the Dallas Opera. For many, the Cowboys Stadium Simulcast will mark their first, live experience of the art form in any venue.
Gene Jones (the wife of Dallas Cowboys Owner, President and General Manager Jerry Jones), whose vision led to the Stadium’s museum-quality collection of contemporary art, set the stage for the announcement explaining, “Sports and art are not typically thought of as belonging together. Yet sporting events and great art do something similar—they get people talking.”
Now, people are talking about family outings to the Dallas Opera at Cowboys Stadium, many of them to experience a live classical performance or opera for the very first time.

Mozart’s THE MAGIC FLUTE will be simulcast live on Saturday, April 28, 2012 at 7:30 PM (doors open at 6:00 PM) at the high-tech home of the Dallas Cowboys at One Legends Way in Arlington, Texas. Patrons will be able to enjoy a complete, unabridged live performance from the Margot and Bill Winspear Opera House in the Dallas Arts District onto the world’s largest high-definition video board structure, comprised of four massive viewing screens (the largest, 72 feet tall and 160 feet wide) suspended directly above the playing field.
Reserved seating is still available (up to 10 seats per person) through the Dallas Opera website at www.dallasopera.org/cowboys.

“We are excited to partner with the Dallas Opera on such a distinctive event,” said Dallas Cowboys Executive Vice President of Brand Management Charlotte Anderson. “Our organization admires and respects The Dallas Opera’s original thinking and stewardship in making a ground-breaking event like this a reality. We truly value the importance of the arts in our community, and we hope that this first-of-its-kind opera broadcast gives us a way of sharing our love of the arts with a new audience at Cowboys Stadium.”

“One of the goals of the Dallas Opera is to bring great singing and world-class theater to the widest possible audience,” explained Dallas Opera General Director and CEO Keith Cerny. “As part of our commitment to expanding our community outreach we are thrilled to announce an unprecedented, ‘game-changing’ collaboration with the Cowboys organization. Let me also say that the Dallas Opera is especially grateful for the generous support of the Jones Family, encouraging our efforts to create one of the most unique and memorable events in the history of this opera company.
“The plans for the simulcast have generated an enormously positive response from all sectors of the community, as well as the classical music world,” Mr. Cerny adds. “This tremendous outpouring of interest not only exceeded my initial expectations, it also underscores my firm belief that 21st century audiences hunger for more from their artistic and cultural experiences and are willing to try new things in search of something remarkable, perhaps even unique.
“It’s a tall order—and one we plan to deliver on, April 28th at Cowboys Stadium.”

~~~~
Mozart’s 1791 masterpiece is one of the greatest comic operas of all time, made all the more interesting by the poignant—even disturbing—moments endured by the lead characters, as they attempt to earn their “happy ending.”
The Magic Flute comes by its zany plot honestly, having been inspired not only by 18th century Masonic practices, but by literature reflecting several different traditions.
The music, on the other hand, couldn’t be more polished or more focused. Reflecting the highest ideals of the Age of Enlightenment and filled with wit, warmth, and genuine humanity, The Magic Flute continues to bewitch audiences with its variety of perfectly expressed musical moods—from utterly comic to soaring and sublime.

Thousands of tickets to the simulcast have been offered to various student groups and school districts to enable their students to share in this extraordinary experience. Requests have poured in from schools, churches, universities (UTD’s McDermott Scholars Program, Howard Payne University, Texas Christian University, Sam Houston State University and Kilgore College), afterschool programs, and music and language programs. From Cub Scout Dens to Senior Citizen Centers, the rush for the remaining free tickets is well-underway.
~~~~
Single tickets for the final mainstage productions of the Dallas Opera’s “Tragic Obsessions” Season are on sale now, starting at just $25, through the Dallas Opera Ticket Services Office at 214.443.1000 or online at www.dallasopera.org. Student Rush best-available tickets can be purchased at the lobby box office for $25 (one per valid Student I.D.) ninety minutes prior to each performance.
Secure your seats today for the remaining spring mainstage productions: La traviata, and The Magic Flute!
~~~~

EVENTS AND GUEST ARTISTS SUBJECT TO CHANGE

THE DALLAS OPERA GRATEFULLY ACKNOWLEDGES
THE TEXAS INSTRUMENTS FOUNDATION,
PRESENTER OF THE 2011-2012 SEASON

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION ABOUT THE “TRAGIC OBSESSIONS” SEASON
IS CONVENIENTLY AVAILABLE ONLINE, 24/7
VISIT WWW.DALLASOPERA.ORG

For high-resolution, digital photographs suitable for print
To arrange an interview
Or for additional information
Please contact Suzanne Calvin, Manager/Director Media & PR
214.443.1014 or suzanne.calvin@dallasopera.org

THE DALLAS OPERA WISHES TO EXPRESS ITS GRATITUDE TO OUR EXCLUSIVE PARTNERS:

AMERICAN AIRLINES – OFFICIAL AIRLINE OF THE DALLAS OPERA
LEXUS – OFFICIAL VEHICLE OF THE DALLAS OPERA
CARTIER – OFFICIAL JEWELER & WATCHMAKER OF THE DALLAS OPERA
ROSEWOOD CRESCENT HOTEL – OFFICIAL HOTEL OF THE DALLAS OPERA

THE DALLAS OPERA 2011-2012 SPRING SEASON INFORMATION
The Dallas Opera celebrates its Fifty-Fifth International Season in the Margot and Bill Winspear Opera House at the AT&T Performing Arts Center in downtown Dallas. Evening performances will begin at 7:30 p.m. and Sunday matinees will begin at 2:00 p.m. Performances of The Lighthouse (new chamber opera series) will take place in the Dee and Charles Wyly Theatre located directly across Flora street from the Winspear in the AT&T Performing Arts Center. English translations will be projected above the stage at every performance. Assistance is available for the hearing impaired. All ticket sales are final and no late seating is permitted prior to intermission.

THE LIGHTHOUSE by Peter Maxwell Davies
Inaugural production of the Dallas Opera Chamber Series
Presented in collaboration with the Dallas Theater Center
In the Dee and Charles Wyly Theatre at the AT&T Performing Arts Center
March 16, 17 & 18(m), 2012
A chilling supernatural and psychological thriller!
Time: December 1900
Place: Edinburgh Court of Enquiry, Fladda Isle Lighthouse off the Scottish coast
Conductor: Nicole Paiement*
Stage Director: Kevin Moriarty* (opera directorial debut)
Scenic Design: Beowulf Boritt*
Costume Design: Claudia Stephens*
Starring: (in order of vocal appearance:) Andrew Bidlack* (Officer 1/Sandy), Robert Orth (Officer 2/Blazes), and Daniel Sumegi (Officer 3/Arthur/Voice of the Cards).

LA TRAVIATA by Giuseppe Verdi
April 13, 15(m), 18, 21, 27 & 29(m), 2012
Let’s Party Like It’s 1849!
An opera in three acts first performed in Venice at Teatro La Fenice, March 6, 1853
Text by Francesco Maria Piave, based on Alexandre Dumas’ play, La dame aux camélias
Time: 19th century
Place: Paris
Conductor: Marco Guidarini
Stage Director: Bliss Hebert
Production Design: Allen Charles Klein
Lighting Design: Thomas Hase
Choreographer: Rosa Mercedes*
Wig & make-up Design: David Zimmerman
Chorus Master: Alexander Rom
Starring: Myrtò Papatanasiu** (Violetta Valéry), James Valenti (Alfredo Germont), Laurent Naouri* (Giorgio Germont), Amanda Crider* (Flora Bervoix), Timothy Mix* (Baron Douphol), Mark McCrory (Marchese D’Obigny), Ethan Herschenfeld* (Doctor Grenvil), and Susan Nicely (Annina).

THE MAGIC FLUTE by W.A. Mozart
April 20, 22(m), 25, 28, May 4 & 6(m), 2012
Hearts Tested, Tried and True!
An opera in two acts first performed in Vienna, September 30, 1791.
Text by Emanuel Schikaneder.
Time: Legendary
Place: Mythological Egypt
Conductor: Graeme Jenkins
Production: August Everding
Stage Director: Matthew Lata
Scenic Design: Jörg Zimmermann*
Costume Design: Renate Kalanke*
Lighting Design: Duane Schuler
Wig & make-up Design: David Zimmerman
Chorus Master: Alexander Rom
Children’s Chorus Master: Melinda Cotten
Starring: Ava Pine (Pamina), Shawn Mathey* (Tamina), Patrick Carfizzi (Papageno), L’ubica Vargicová* (The Queen of the Night), Raymond Aceto (Sarastro), Kevin Langan (The Speaker), David Cangelosi (Monostatos), Angela Mannino* (Papagena), Caitlin Lynch* (First Lady), Lauren McNeese* (Second Lady), Maya Lahyani* (Third Lady), Aaron Blake (First Man in Armour) and Darren K. Stokes* (Second Man in Armour).

* Dallas Opera Debut
** American Operatic Debut

______________________________________________________________________________________
The Dallas Opera is supported, in part, by funds from: City of Dallas, Office of Cultural Affairs; TACA; the Texas Commission on the Arts and The National Endowment for the Arts (NEA). American Airlines is the official airline of The Dallas Opera. Lexus is the official vehicle of The Dallas Opera. Cartier is the official jeweler and watchmaker of The Dallas Opera. Rosewood Crescent Hotel is the official hotel of The Dallas Opera. Advertising support from The Dallas Morning News. A special thanks to Mrs. William W. Winspear and the Elsa von Seggern Foundation for their continuing support.

###

Introducing “Three Questions for Keith”

by Suzanne Calvin

THREE QUESTIONS FOR KEITH
(Why? Because You Really Want to Know)

This month’s questions for Dallas Opera General Director and CEO Keith Cerny are from James Faust, Artistic Director of Dallas Film Society and host of the DALLAS International Film Festival, April 12-22, 2012.  He asks:

1. Is Opera for everyone?

Opera at its heart is about great singing and powerful theater brought together, accompanied by an orchestra—and sometimes including dance as well. Theater has been part of the Western cultural tradition going back more than 2,000 years, which speaks to its power and universal appeal. The human voice is a remarkable instrument; it connects with performers at a visceral level more closely than any other instrument. After all, a violinist can improve his or her tone quality by upgrading their instrument, but a singer must develop the voice that they were born with. Because opera weaves together all of these important traditions, I believe passionately that opera is, in fact, for everyone. That being said, not all operas are as accessible or comprehensible for first-time listeners, so I recommend giving some thought to your first experience. This spring, we will be presenting two wonderful works that are ideal for first-time opera goers: Verdi’s La traviata and Mozart’s The Magic Flute.

2. What’s the greatest Opera turned into a film or vice versa?

My personal favorite opera turned into a film is Ingmar Bergman’s 1975 film of Mozart’s The Magic Flute. I love the musical interpretation in this film, as it beautifully captures the gentleness and innocence of the piece, and brings out its lyrical qualities. (Knowing the German version as well as I do, I still struggle with hearing the text in Swedish, but the warmth and intimacy of the film allows me to overlook this aspect). In many ways, the film anticipated the artistic choices that opera companies now face with simulcasts and DVDs of opera; Bergman’s film is a movie made on an opera set, rather than a recording of a true live performance. The movie contains many close-ups of singers that would not be possible in a typical opera house, and the lighting and theatrical makeup draw their inspiration from movies or TV rather than an actual opera performance. Bergman uses shots of the face of a young girl in the audience (his real-life granddaughter) almost as a leitmotif, to remind us of the importance of the audience in the performance. I also relish/enjoy –I don’t think savor quite works how the director films the opera’s characters on both the mainstage and backstage. The footage of the intermission contains marvelous comic touches: Pamina beating Tamino at chess, Sarastro is studying the score of Parsifal, and the Queen of the Night is smoking a cigarette.

My favorite film to include opera in a cameo role is Orson Wells’ 1941 classic Citizen Kane—still regularly selected as one of the greatest films ever made. In this film, Charles Foster Kane’s mistress, who later becomes his second wife, is an aspiring opera singer. Kane is determined to advance her career, and uses his newspapers in different cities to promote her rising “talent.” Ultimately, though, even his control of the press cannot overcome her mediocrity. The scenes showing her struggling to please her vocal coach, and the shot of two stagehands holding their noses in response to her performance is especially memorable, because it is much more difficult for an actor to play a mediocre opera singer than an out-and-out bad one.

And while we’re on the subject of opera in film, I would mention a third favorite: the cult film Diva. This 1981 film centers around a famous aria from a seldom performed opera, Catalani’s La Wally. Wilhemenia Fernandez as the film’s protagonist sings the famous aria “Ebben? Ne andrò lontan,” which is one of the highlights of La Wally. I particularly enjoy how opera as an art form is portrayed as hip and glamorous in this movie—no small feat when it is based on a lovely, yet relatively unknown, opera.

3. Will the Dallas Opera ever perform a “rock” Opera?

When I meet opera patrons for the first time, they often assume that I listen to nothing but opera. Actually, I enjoy listening to a wide range of music. The band The Who arguably created the rock opera genre in the 1970s, and the original musical Tommy, written by Pete Townsend and Des McAnuff contains some great music. The artistic impulse to knit together a series of rock songs, which tend to be relatively short, into an overall story-line was a very influential model (even if one argues that the Beatles’ Sergeant Pepper’s got there first).

So will the Dallas Opera perform a “rock ” Opera? Probably not. But it’s not because some of them aren’t great music and theater. Every opera company is wrestling with the question of what works to add to their core repertoire. The Lyric Opera of Chicago revived Showboat this winter to great critical acclaim. Other opera companies have performed Gilbert & Sullivan, and George Gershwin’s Porgy & Bess has been revived by the Dallas Opera, as well asother major opera companies, many times.

To me, the issue is one of artistic “stretch.” The Dallas Opera’s core mission is producing grand opera, with occasional chamber operas added in. As a producing company, we hire top singers and other artists from directors to designers, and bring in orchestral players from outside of North Texas when needed (e.g. the banjo player in our mid-March production of Peter Maxwell-Davies’ The Lighthouse). While we could hire singers and rock musicians for a work like Tommy, it isn’t really what we do best. It would also put us into more direct competition for audiences and supporters with other excellent producing and presenting companies in North Texas (such as the Dallas Theater Center, the AT&T Performing Arts Center, and Dallas Summer Musicals).

Thanks for the questions, James!

About James Faust: James Faust, Artistic Director of Dallas Film Society, loves his family. Loves film. Loves Dallas. Wants you to stay in school.

James Faust | Artistic Director| Dallas Film Society
Host of the DALLAS International Film Festival -- April 12-22, 2012
3625 North Hall Street, suite 740 | Dallas, Texas 75219
P 214.720.0555 | F 214.720.0551 | C 214.505.3681
Jfaust@dallasfilm.org | www.dallasfilm.org

From the Desk of Artistic Director Jonathan Pell

by Megan Meister

Well, I can start to breathe again.

Last Friday morning when I arrived in the office at 8:00 a.m. I found a deeply distressing e-mail from Myrtò Papatanasiu’s manager in Italy, informing me that there had been an accident on stage during a performance of Rusalka at the Théâtre de la Monnaie in Brussels on the preceding Wednesday night and Miss Papatansiu’s foot  had been seriously injured by a piece of scenery during a set change.   Apparently, she was able to finish the performance, and was able to sing the final performance on Friday night, but now, rather than coming straight to Dallas to begin rehearsals for her American debut as “Violetta” in our production of La traviata on Saturday as planned, she was returning to her home in Athens to have her foot x-rayed and examined by her own doctor.  Naturally, I was concerned for her, but I was also worried about our rehearsals, which were scheduled to begin on Monday morning with the conductor, stage director and the rest of our cast.   There isn’t a lot they could do without a “Violetta” and there was, of course, the very real possibility that she might discover that her injury was even more serious than originally feared, and that she might have to cancel.

I was greatly appreciative for the e-mail I received on Saturday from Peter de Caluwe, the general director of the Monnaie, who wrote in reply to my inquiry, and explained in more detail what had happened, and he reassured me that he thought that Myrtò would be fine and that he didn’t think that she would cancel her appearance in Dallas.

She did in fact, go to the doctor in Athens first thing on Monday morning and the x-ray didn’t reveal any bones broken in her foot, and apparently a lot of the swelling had gone down since the accident.  I received an e-mail on Monday afternoon confirming that she was on her way home to pack.

I am writing all this now because, although she is still in some pain, her plane just landed at DFW and she is scheduled to begin rehearsals first thing tomorrow morning.

She is, of course,  renowned for her portrayal of the heroine in this most personal of all Verdi’s operas, but Myrtò has never performed La traviata with this particular conductor, director or any of our cast, so there is much to do to make up for lost time.    Fortunately we still have more than three weeks before we open.

I was really looking forward to her debut with the company and being able to add her name to the distinguished list of foreign artists who have made their American debut with The Dallas Opera, so I am really glad and greatly relieved that she is finally here.

I prefer the drama to be on the stage and not in my office…

NOT Too Cool for School

by Suzanne Calvin

It’s the official roll-out of the company’s education programs for this summer and the following school year. Read it and wish you were ten again:

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:
Wednesday, March 21, 2012
Contact: Suzanne Calvin
214-443-1014/suzanne.calvin@dallasopera.org

THE DALLAS OPERA IS PROUD TO ANNOUNCE
The 2012-2013 Education Programs
SERVING NORTH TEXAS STUDENTS AGE 5 TO ADULT
~~~~
PRESENTED BY TEXAS INSTRUMENTS,
THE TEXAS INSTRUMENTS FOUNDATION,
AND THE PEROT FOUNDATION
~~~~
NEW AND EXPANDED PARTNERSHIPS WITH SMU AND UNT
~~~~
OPTIONS INCLUDE TOURING OPERAS, AFTERSCHOOL PROGRAMMING, SUMMER CAMP SESSIONS, AND
BEHIND-THE-SCENES ACCESS
~~~~
SUMMER REGISTRATION BEGINS TODAY!

DALLAS, MARCH 21, 2012 – The Dallas Opera is proud to announce the company’s Educational Programs for the 2012-2013 Season, presented by Texas Instruments, The Texas Instruments Foundation, and The Perot Foundation.
After doubling the number of students served in Fiscal 2012 to approximately 23,500 students (compared to the previous year), the Dallas Opera continues to make inroads into the community through touring operas, budget-conscious family programming, and both new and expanded partnerships with local University music programs at SMU’s Meadows School of the Arts and the College of Music at the University of North Texas.

“Educating the next generation of classical music and opera patrons isn’t an option—it’s a welcome responsibility that must be met” explains Dallas Opera General Director and CEO Keith Cerny. “The Dallas Opera and other arts organizations have long realized that many children are not being adequately exposed to the classical arts either at home or in school. These art forms help young people connect with their past as well as embrace their options for the future, and increase our collective understanding of what it means to be human.”
Adds Mr. Cerny, “Few things are more likely to stunt our development and stifle our creative impulses than a life lived without generous exposure to the arts.”

Dallas Opera Educational Programs for the upcoming fiscal year include both summer programming and school year programs. Registration for summer sessions begins today with a deadline of May 1, 2012. Registration for the fall the spring sessions will begin on September 5, 2012 and close on October 1, 2012.
For additional information, go to http://www.dallasopera.org/learn/students/
or call the Dallas Opera at 214.443.1000 and ask for Education.

“We’ve left behind the era of ‘one-size-fits-all’ arts programs,” explains Dallas Opera CMO/Director of Community Outreach Jennifer Schuder. “We are committed to addressing the needs of an increasingly diverse student population, from those who may be encountering classical music and theater for the very first time to those who have already decided to pursue a career in opera.”

TDO AFTERSCHOOL PROGRAMS:

1. SUMMER campTDO™ (for Grades 3-8)
Explore the world of JACK AND THE BEANSTALK at campTDO! Join the Dallas Opera for a three-hour interactive workshop that gives students firsthand experience in creating an opera production. Working under the guidance of TDO teaching artists, each campTDO session will conclude with a fully staged performance of JACK, featuring TDO teaching artists.

CampTDO sessions can accommodate up to 200 students, including groups from different Afterschool Providers. All campTDO sessions are at the Karayanis Rehearsal/Production Center located outside Fair Park at Gate 12. Eight sessions are offered during the months of June and July.

This program is FREE to Afterschool Providers.

2. FALL/SPRING TDOinaSuitcase™ (for Grades 3-6)
The world of John Davies’ operatic version of the fairy tale JACK AND THE BEANSTALK comes to the classroom as part of TDO’s expanded TDOinaSuitcase. Day One is an interactive visual arts and musical activities program; Day Two is a charming performance of JACK AND THE BEANSTALK. Both parts of this program are designed to be executed in a convenient cafeteria, library or auditorium.

Available in select weeks from September 2012 through May 2013, this program is FREE to Afterschool Providers. Registration begins September 5, 2012.

Performances of JACK AND THE BEANSTALK presented in artistic collaboration with Dallas Children’s Theater.

STUDENT PERFORMANCE PROGRAMS:

1. TDO Student Matinees (for Grades 4-8)
The chandelier will float up to the ceiling and the lights will dim, as students settle into their seats for a fully staged performance of Georges Bizet’s DOCTOR MIRACLE, live at the Winspear Opera House. This one-act opera is a comedic gem that ensures true love will prevail through the making of an omelet. Students will experience a fully staged opera, featuring the Dallas Opera Orchestra and a cast of exceptional young singers from the graduate programs of the SMU Vocal Department and the UNT Opera Program.

TDO Student Matinees are supported by TEKS-aligned curriculum materials and comprehensive teacher training.

Cost: $4.00 per ticket. Tickets are assigned in the order of request. Registration begins September 5, 2012; deadline October 1, 2012. Payment Deadline: December 12, 2012.

2. TDO2go™ Touring Opera (for Grades 4-8)
Ideal for student groups of all sizes, from 100 to a thousand; our touring opera brings a fully staged production of Georges Bizet’s DOCTOR MIRACLE to your school cafeteria, gym, or auditorium. Schools provide a 15’ x 20’ performance space with a tuned piano. This 45-minute, one-act opera is a comedic gem that ensures that true love prevails through the making of an omelet. DOCTOR MIRACLE is the perfect student introduction to opera, and it features exciting young singers from the graduate programs of the SMU Vocal Department and the UNT Opera Program.

TDO2go performances are supported by TEKS-aligned curriculum materials and comprehensive teacher training.

Performed during select weeks, October 2012 through May 2013 at 10:30 a.m.

Cost: $100 per performance, public schools
$500 per performance, private schools

Registration begins September 5, 2012 and ends October 1, 2012. Tour bookings for TDO2go are assigned in the order they are requested.

OPERA EXPERIENCE PROGRAMS:

1. TDOSneakPeek™ (for Grades 6-College)
This program allows area middle school, high school, and college music teachers to introduce their students to opera, while observing the artistic process at a working Final Dress rehearsal of a main stage TDO production.

TDOSneakPeek is supported by TEKS-aligned curriculum materials and comprehensive teacher training. Tickets are FREE, yet limited, and will be assigned in the order requested. Registration begins September 5, 2012; deadline October 1, 2012.

2. TDOSightlines™ (for Grades 6-College)
Due to the configuration of the Winspear Opera House, there are several areas of the performance hall that have partial (or restricted) views of the stage. Through the TDOSightlines Program, these seats are offered—FREE of charge—to area middle, high school, and college music teachers and their students. Upcoming performances include: AIDA, TURANDOT, DOCTOR MIRACLE, the TDO Family Concert, and THE ASPERN PAPERS.

Seating is limited and will be allocated in the order of requests received. Registration begins September 5, 2012 and ends October 1, 2012.

3. AccessTDO™ (for Grades 9-College)
Can you imagine yourself as an opera star? Or perhaps leading the orchestra? Are imaginative sets and costumes more tailored to your skills? AccessTDO is designed for students now studying music or preparing for a career in the performing arts. Students are given the opportunity to experience firsthand what it takes to put an opera onstage, by observing working rehearsals and interacting with internationally acclaimed artists, designers, and other members of the production team. Area high school and college music and drama teachers are invited to bring their students to a series of four events between October 2012 and April 2013. Each session will begin with an informative, 45-minute interactive discussion followed by the chance to observe an hour of a working mainstage rehearsal—and whatever ensues!

Space is limited to 350 students per event. Group reservations can be made by a certified teacher; students can also make reservations on an individual basis for one or all four events. Requests will be processed in the order in which they are received.

The AccessTDO program is supported by TEKS-aligned curriculum materials and comprehensive teacher training. Registration begins September 5, 2012 and ends October 1, 2012. AccessTDO is FREE.

4. Student Rush/Student OPERAtunities Program (for Grades 9-College)
Experience Grand Opera on a tuition-friendly budget. If you are a fulltime student, under the age of 35, there are two great ways to get a great deal on TDO tickets:

The TDO Student Rush program allows qualifying students to purchase best-available seats at the box office, beginning 90 minutes prior to each performance. Present a valid student I.D. in order to purchase a balcony seat ($15-25) or best-available orchestra seat ($50).

You can also sign-up to receive occasional emails when best-available seats are available for advance purchase through the TDO Student OPERAtunities program. Exact seat locations will not be assigned until 24 hours prior to the performance and will be available for pick up at Will Call. Quantities are limited and advance student tickets may not be available for all Dallas Opera performances.
$15 – Best Available Balcony Seats (Opening Night and Midweek)
$25 – Best Available Balcony Seats (Sunday Matinees and Saturdays)
$50 – Best Available Orchestra Seats (all performances)

TDO offers comprehensive, TEKS-aligned curriculum encompassing five subjects: music, social studies, math, language arts and visual arts. The Dallas Opera presents two training sessions each school year (in the fall) to brief teachers participating in our programs on the lessons and materials we make available, to better prepare their students for their opera experience.

FREE training sessions will be held in the Margot and Bill Winspear Opera House at the AT&T Performing Arts Center. They will conclude with a tour of the facility. Participating teachers will also receive a free voucher for four tickets to any performance of TDO’s Family Programming during the 2012-2013 Season.

~~~~

DALLAS OPERA EDUCATIONAL PROGRAMS PARTNERS

Underwriters
($40,000 and up)
The Perot Foundation
Texas Instruments
Texas Instruments Foundation

Sponsors
($15,000 and up)
David M. Crowley Foundation
Hunt Oil Company
JPMorgan Chase Foundation
Kimberly-Clark Corporation
Lockheed Martin
The Priddy Foundation

Partners
($7,000 and up)
Akin Gump Strauss Hauer & Feld, L.L.P.
Baker Botts, L.L.P.
Alice E. and Joseph C. Blewett Foundation
The Boeing Company Charitable Trust
ExxonMobil Corporation
The Rosewood Foundation

Friends
($500 and up)
Theodore and Beulah Beasley Foundation
Credit Suisse
Diagnostic Assessment Services
Fannie and Stephen Kahn Charitable Foundation
Mary Potishman Lard Trust
Garland D. Rhoads Foundation
Harold Simmons Foundation

~~~~
Single tickets for the remaining mainstage productions of the Dallas Opera’s “Tragic Obsessions” Season are on sale now, starting at just $25, through the Dallas Opera Ticket Services Office at 214.443.1000 or online at www.dallasopera.org. Student Rush best-available tickets can be purchased at the lobby box office for $25 (one per valid Student I.D.) ninety minutes prior to each performance.

~~~~

THE DALLAS OPERA GRATEFULLY ACKNOWLEDGES
THE TEXAS INSTRUMENTS FOUNDATION,
PRESENTER OF THE 2011-2012 SEASON

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION ABOUT “MARCH AT THE DALLAS OPERA”
IS CONVENIENTLY AVAILABLE ONLINE, 24/7
VISIT WWW.DALLASOPERA.ORG AND CHECK THE CALENDAR LISTINGS

For high-resolution, digital photographs suitable for print
To arrange an interview
Or for additional information
Please contact Suzanne Calvin, Manager/Director Media & PR
214.443.1014 or suzanne.calvin@dallasopera.org

THE DALLAS OPERA WISHES TO EXPRESS ITS GRATITUDE TO OUR EXCLUSIVE PARTNERS:

AMERICAN AIRLINES – OFFICIAL AIRLINE OF THE DALLAS OPERA
LEXUS – OFFICIAL VEHICLE OF THE DALLAS OPERA
CARTIER – OFFICIAL JEWELER & WATCHMAKER OF THE DALLAS OPERA
ROSEWOOD CRESCENT HOTEL – OFFICIAL HOTEL OF THE DALLAS OPERA

Ticket Information for the 2011-2012 Dallas Opera Season

All performances are in the acoustically acclaimed Margot and Bill Winspear Opera House at the AT&T Performing Arts Center. FLEX subscriptions (three outstanding main- stage performances) begin at just $75. Single tickets start at just $25. For additional information, contact the friendly staff at The Dallas Opera Ticket Services Office at 214.443.1000 or visit us online at www.dallasopera.org. Principal cast members and events may be subject to change. All ticket sales are final.

THE DALLAS OPERA 2011-2012 SPRING SEASON INFORMATION
The Dallas Opera celebrates its Fifty-Fifth International Season in the Margot and Bill Winspear Opera House at the AT&T Performing Arts Center in downtown Dallas. With the exception of Tristan & Isolde, evening performances will begin at 7:30 p.m. and Sunday matinees will begin at 2:00 p.m. Tristan’s evening performances will start at 7:00 p.m. and matinees at 2:00 p.m. Performances of The Lighthouse (new chamber opera series) will take place in the Dee and Charles Wyly Theatre located directly across the street from the Winspear in the AT&T Performing Arts Center. English translations will be projected above the stage at every performance. Assistance is available for the hearing impaired. Student Rush tickets are available at the box office 90 minutes prior to each performance, valid student ID’s required.

TRISTAN & ISOLDE by Richard Wagner
February 16, 19(m), 22 & 25, 2012
A Special Opera-in-Concert, with projections by Moby-Dick’s Elaine McCarthy!
Ancient Myths, Modern Cine-Magic! And a special curtain time: 7:00 p.m.!
An opera in two acts first performed in Munich, June 10, 1865.
Text by Richard Wagner, based on an ancient Celtic and Icelandic legend.
Time: Legendary
Place: A ship at sea; outside King Marke’s palace, Cornwall; Tristan’s castle at Kareol
Conductor: Graeme Jenkins
Stage Director: Christian Räth
Video Design: Elaine McCarthy
Lighting Design: Alan Burrett
Wig & make-up Design: David Zimmerman
Chorus Master: Alexander Rom
Starring: Jeanne-Michele Charbonnet (Isolde), Clifton Forbis (Tristan), Mary Phillips (Brangäne), Jukka Rasilainen** (Kurvenal), Kristinn Sigmundsson* (King Marke), Stephen Gadd** (Melot), and Aaron Blake (A Young Sailor/A Shepherd).

THE LIGHTHOUSE by Peter Maxwell Davies
Inaugural production of the Dallas Opera Chamber Series
Presented in collaboration with the Dallas Theater Center
In the Dee and Charles Wyly Theatre at the AT&T Performing Arts Center
March 16, 17 & 18(m), 2012
A chilling supernatural and psychological thriller!
Time: December 1900
Place: Edinburgh Court of Enquiry, Fladda Isle Lighthouse off the Scottish coast
Conductor: Nicole Paiement*
Stage Director: Kevin Moriarty* (opera directorial debut)
Scenic Design: Beowulf Boritt*
Costume Design: Claudia Stephens*
Starring: (in order of vocal appearance:) Andrew Bidlack* (Officer 1/Sandy), Robert Orth (Officer 2/Blazes), and Daniel Sumegi (Officer 3/Arthur/Voice of the Cards).

LA TRAVIATA by Giuseppe Verdi
April 13, 15(m), 18, 21, 27 & 29(m), 2012
Let’s Party Like It’s 1849!
An opera in three acts first performed in Venice at Teatro La Fenice, March 6, 1853
Text by Francesco Maria Piave, based on Alexandre Dumas’ play, La dame aux camélias
Time: 19th century
Place: Paris
Conductor: Marco Guidarini
Stage Director: Bliss Hebert
Production Design: Allen Charles Klein
Lighting Design: Thomas Hase
Choreographer: Rosa Mercedes*
Wig & make-up Design: David Zimmerman
Chorus Master: Alexander Rom
Starring: Myrtò Papatanasiu** (Violetta Valéry), James Valenti (Alfredo Germont), Laurent Naouri* (Giorgio Germont), Amanda Crider* (Flora Bervoix), Timothy Mix* (Baron Douphol), Mark McCrory (Marchese D’Obigny), Ethan Herschenfeld* (Doctor Grenvil), and Susan Nicely (Annina).

THE MAGIC FLUTE by W.A. Mozart
April 20, 22(m), 25, 28, May 4 & 6(m), 2012
Hearts Tested, Tried and True!
An opera in two acts first performed in Vienna, September 30, 1791.
Text by Emanuel Schikaneder.
Time: Legendary
Place: Mythological Egypt
Conductor: Graeme Jenkins
Production: August Everding
Stage Director: Matthew Lata
Scenic Design: Jörg Zimmermann*
Costume Design: Renate Kalanke*
Lighting Design: Duane Schuler
Wig & make-up Design: David Zimmerman
Chorus Master: Alexander Rom
Children’s Chorus Master: Melinda Cotten
Starring: Ava Pine (Pamina), Shawn Mathey* (Tamina), Patrick Carfizzi (Papageno), L’ubica Vargicová* (The Queen of the Night), Raymond Aceto (Sarastro), Kevin Langan (The Speaker), David Cangelosi (Monostatos), Angela Mannino* (Papagena), Caitlin Lynch* (First Lady), Lauren McNeese* (Second Lady), Maya Lahyani* (Third Lady), Aaron Blake (First Man in Armour) and Darren K. Stokes* (Second Man in Armour).

* Dallas Opera Debut
** American Debut

______________________________________________________________________________________
The Dallas Opera is supported, in part, by funds from: City of Dallas, Office of Cultural Affairs; TACA; the Texas Commission on the Arts and The National Endowment for the Arts (NEA). American Airlines is the official airline of The Dallas Opera. Lexus is the official vehicle of The Dallas Opera. Cartier is the official jeweler and watchmaker of The Dallas Opera. Rosewood Crescent Hotel is the official hotel of The Dallas Opera. Advertising support from The Dallas Morning News. A special thanks to Mrs. William W. Winspear and the Elsa von Seggern Foundation for their continuing support.

###

TOP THIS!

by Megan Meister

The Dallas Opera Guild’s 24th Annual Vocal Competition for young opera singers ended on a high-note (somehow, it always does) on Saturday, March 10th in the Winspear Opera House, when ten outstanding finalists with Texas connections were awarded a total of $20,000 in prize monies, following a nearly unprecedented “battle of the sopranos.”

29-year-old soprano Heather Hawk of Weatherford, who is currently pursuing her doctorate in Musical Arts at the University of North Texas, held the audience transfixed with powerful renditions of “Il est doux, il est bon” from Massenet’s Hérodiade and “Ah, mio cor!” from Händel’s Alcina, accompanied by pianist Julian Reed.  Earlier in the day, she performed selections from Così fan tutte and Adriana Lecouvreur during the semifinals round.

Miss Hawk received her $8,000 First Place cash prize from this year’s special honorees: Elaine and Bill Blaylock.

The award for Second Place ($5,000) and the “People’s Choice Award” (an additional $1,000) went to 23-year-old soprano Amanda Woodbury, a graduate of Frisco High School, now working towards her Master’s degree at the Cincinnati College -- Conservatory of Music.  Miss Woodbury took home Second Place in the 2010 Dallas Opera Guild Vocal Competition, and another Second Place Award in the 2011 Metropolitan Opera Mid-South Regional Competition.

The young singer gave a luminous finals round performance of arias from Mozart’s Die Entführung aus dem Serail and Puccini’s La Rondine, accompanied by Julian Reed.

Her award for Second Place was given to her by the Dallas Opera Guild’s Michael Phillips.  The “People’s Choice Award,” based on secret ballots cast by members of the competition audience, was bestowed on Miss Woodbury by Dallas Opera Guild Presidents Jane and David McGinnis.

The Third Place Award and a $3,000 cash prize went to 29-year-old soprano Elisabeth Rosenberg, who also was accompanied by pianist Julian Reed.  Following moving semi-finals round performances of “Ain’t it a Pretty Night” from Carlisle Floyd’s Susannah and “Morrai, si” from Händel’s Rodelinda, she gave breathtaking renditions of Micaëla’s aria from Act III of Georges Bizet’s Carmen and “Mi tradi quell’alma ingrate” from Mozart’s Don Giovanni.  Miss Rosenberg has appeared onstage in numerous roles for Rice University, where she is currently pursuing her Master’s degree).

Her prize was awarded by Contestant Co-Chair Don Jones.

This year’s optional “Encouragement Award” was given to 22-year-old soprano Vanessa Becerra, a senior at Texas Christian University where she is a Nordan Full-Tuition Award winner.  During the finals, she performed “Kommt ein schlanker Bursch gegangen” from Weber’s Der Freischütz and “Caro nome” from Verdi’s Rigoletto, accompanied by pianist Jason Smith.

Miss Becerra’s $1,500 cash prize was awarded by the Dallas Opera Guild’s Fran Burke.

“With funding for the arts rapidly diminishing,” explained Guild Competition Co-Chair Fred Ciarochi, “it’s great to have this opportunity to recognize, honor and promote homegrown talent, particularly when you realize how many of our Guild Vocal Competition singers go on to become nationally and internationally recognized.

“Just sitting in the audience is a thrilling experience and when audience members cast their personal votes for the ‘People’s Choice Award’—now in its fifteenth year—you can detect how passionate people become when singers’ careers are at stake.”

In addition to the big money awards, six finalists were presented with $250 cash prizes, so no one went home empty-handed – least of all the audience!

Suzanne Calvin, Manager/Director of Media & PR for the Dallas Opera, is an award-winning journalist, producer, classical music broadcaster and playwright.  Most importantly, she tells you prior to each TDO performance to turn off your cellphone.  You were listening, right?

Glowing Reviews for The Lighthouse

by Suzanne Calvin

The limited engagement of the Dallas Opera’s new production of THE LIGHTHOUSE is now history -- but the accolades continue to roll in on the tide.

Katie Womack of “The Observer” found it a “strange yet engrossing musical and theatrical experience.” Read more of her review here.

Over at “Theater Jones,” critic Gregory Sullivan Isaacs proclaimed the production a “must-see” and one that gave him a “glimmer of hope” for a new era of artistic collaboration that will demolish old barriers and preconceptions.  Read his illuminating  article here.  And go back and catch the splendid series TJ has produced on the making of THE LIGHTHOUSE.

Veteran arts writer Olin Chism, reviewing for KERA’s “Art and Seek,” found it “a powerful theater piece, with music serving an attendant though striking role.”  Catch Olin’s review here.

David Weuste of “Everyday Opera” called it “a shining start” to our new, dedicated chamber series and found reasons to praise virtually every aspect of the production.  Read his assessment here.

At “The Dallas Morning News,” Classical Music Critic Scott Cantrell says the production was “quite vividly realized by three very fine singers in a deft staging by Kevin Moriarty, artistic director of the Dallas Theater Center.”  Read Scott’s review here.

At “D Magazine,” after asking whether the Dallas Opera had bitten off more than it could chew (or words to that effect), critic Wayne Lee Gay hasn’t yet weighed-in with a final verdict.  We’ll be the first to let you know.

And a new take on the production from Laura Begley at “Operagasm,” a site by and for singers and other people passionate about opera.  Read it here

UPDATE: Also, Alex Hoskins writing for SMU’s “Daily Campus” right here.

(Photo by Karen Almond, Dallas Opera)

Suzanne Calvin, Manager/Director Media and PR

 

 

 

Spooky-Like, and a Whole Lot More

by Suzanne Calvin

All explanations fall short. There’s no way to navigate the treacherous shoals of Peter Maxwell Davies’ THE LIGHTHOUSE, opening Friday, March 16th at 7:30 pm in the Wyly Theater, without actually experiencing it, seeing and hearing it for yourself.

Classical Music Critic Scott Cantrell of “The Dallas Morning News” gives it a go right here. But it’s possible that the more telling advance was the whooping, enthusiastic response from the audience at the conclusion of last night’s final dress rehearsal.

Get your tickets now at 214.443.1000 or here online and make it to THE LIGHTHOUSE. It’s going to be talked about, I guarantee.  DTC Artistic Director Kevin Moriarty will only make his opera debut once, and there’s still time to say “I was there.”

(Photo of composer Peter Maxwell Davies by Eamonn McCabe)

Suzanne Calvin, Manager/Director Media & PR