Good Company

by Suzanne Calvin

It’s incredibly nice to be included when the other organizations acknowledged here are the likes of the Amon G. Carter Foundation; The 500, Inc.; and TACA.  What’s it all about?  “Under the direction of (General Director and) CEO Keith Cerny, the Dallas Opera’s strategic plan is healthy and continues to earn the confidence of the community.” 

More from Marilee Vergati of Examiner.com (posted on CBS/DFW).

Suzanne Calvin, Manager/Director Media & PR

The Dallas Opera is Proud to Announce Soprano Myrtò Papatanasiu as the “Maria Callas Debut Artist of the Year”

by Megan Meister

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:

Thursday, May 17, 2012

Contact: Suzanne Calvin (214.443.1014/suzanne.calvin@dallasopera.org)

Or Megan Meister (214.443.1071/megan.meister@dallasopera.org)

                                                               

THE DALLAS OPERA IS PROUD TO ANNOUNCE

Soprano Myrtò Papatanasiu

SELECTED BY SEASON SUBSCRIBERS AS THE “MARIA CALLAS DEBUT ARTIST OF THE YEAR”

~~~~

VIOLETTA IN THE SPRING SEASON TRIUMPH: LA TRAVIATA

            DALLAS, MAY 17, 2012 – The Dallas Opera is tremendously proud to announce the result of this year’s balloting for the 2012 “Maria Callas Debut Artist of the Year” Award: Greek lyric soprano Myrtò Papatanasiu, who made a celebrated American opera stage debut in the Winspear just five weeks ago.

            The prestigious award is given to a single performer each season for a particularly outstanding and unforgettable company debut.  The selection of Miss Papatanasiu, who astonished audiences with her remarkable vocal qualities and intensely moving portrayal of the doomed Violetta in La traviata, was announced early this evening at the annual Appreciation Dinner for The Dallas Opera Board and Trustees held in the Crescent Ballroom of the Rosewood Crescent Hotel in Uptown Dallas.

Papatanasiu’s performance was praised by Classical Music Critic Scott Cantrell of The Dallas Morning News:   “The Greek soprano Myrtò Papatanasiu, in her American debut, certainly captures Violetta’s every flicker of emotion: by turns carefree and desperate, amazed at falling in love, excruciatingly conflicted at the sacrifice demanded by her lover’s father, alternately hopeful and despairing as she struggles against the dying of the light.”  Cantrell went onto say “She has amazing vocal technique: top notes pinpointed, high flourishes effortlessly tossed off, sure commands of crescendo and decrescendo in any register.”

Dallas Opera Artistic Director Jonathan Pell reacted to the announcement: “I can’t say that I am the least bit surprised that Myrtò has won this year’s award for debut artist of the year.  She is an amazing performer, possessing a stunning combination of physical and vocal beauty, profound musicality, remarkable theatrical instincts and the uncanny ability to be both incredibly strong and heartbreakingly fragile simultaneously.   All of her performances during the run in Dallas were extraordinarily consistent, and yet each of them seemed utterly spontaneous.

“When she first auditioned for me in June 2009, she was completely unknown in this country, but I immediately recognized that she had a really special gift and was someone who Dallas audiences would immediately take to their hearts. This was her American stage debut as well as her Dallas Opera debut, and so I am particularly pleased that our subscribers have selected her for this year’s award.”

~~~~

            “The Dallas Opera is rightly known for its great skill in casting,” explains Dallas Opera General Director and CEO Keith Cerny.  “In some cases, this means bringing highly respected and well-established artists to our stage.  However, we are also committed to shining a spotlight on less familiar—but no less extraordinary—talent, wherever we discover it.

“Myrtò Papatanasiu, who made her American opera stage debut here at TDO, is the perfect example of a phenomenally gifted singer just being introduced to American audiences, after forging a successful career overseas.  From the very first rehearsal, we were struck by her exquisite vocal artistry and incredible stage presence, as well as by her compelling and utterly realistic portrayal in this very difficult role.

“The Callas Award provides the Dallas Opera with a wonderful platform on which to recognize the best and brightest artists the world has to offer,” Cerny adds.  “And our subscribers clearly agreed that Miss Papatanasiu brought Violetta to life in a career-defining performance.”

~~~~

As has been the case for the past several years, balloting for the Callas Award was conducted entirely online.  However, the results were verified by the independent accounting firm of Travis, Wolff & Company, L.L.P.

Each winner receives an etched-crystal plaque, created for The Dallas Opera by award-winning designers from Tiffany & Co., which bears the likeness of legendary soprano Maria Callas, who launched The Dallas Opera with a 1957 recital at the Music Hall in Fair Park.

The 2012 recipient responded to the news, by email from Greece, with a statement read this evening by Mr. Jonathan Pell:

To the Board and Trustees of The Dallas Opera, Jonathan Pell, and the patrons of The Dallas Opera:

 

What a personal honour it is for me, as a Greek artist, to be awarded a prize named after the unforgettable Greek soprano Maria Callas, who left her mark all over the musical world and especially here in the Dallas Opera.

I am deeply moved, and immensely grateful. I gave my heart and soul to my performances in Dallas, and I allowed myself to live the part of Verdi’s amazing musical role. I tried to convey what I felt through my voice, and to bring to life the genuine, earthly, transparent, fragile, passionate, dynamic and generous Violetta. The communication I felt with the audience and the warmth of their appreciation is something that will remain with me forever.

I would like to thank you for this honour, to thank also the directorship of the theatre and in particular Jonathan Pell who was such a great personal support to me. A big thank you is also due to the conductor Marco Guidarini and to the fantastic orchestra for their precision and their sensitive musical interpretation, the chorus and the much loved Alexander Rom, my director Bliss Herbert and Allen Klein. Lastly I would like to mention my colleagues and friends from the cast, with whom I shared this wonderful musical experience, and my partner Dimitri.

I would like to dedicate this prize to Greece my homeland, currently going through such difficult times.

Efharisto -- thank you.

Yours,

 Myrtò Papatanasiu

~~~~

             There were nine additional 2011-2012 Season nominees (artists making outstanding company debuts in a principal role)—all the contenders are listed below in alphabetical order):

NOMINEES FOR 2012 MARIA CALLAS AWARD

Jordan Bisch, bass – “Raimondo” in LUCIA DI LAMMERMOOR

Luca Grassi, baritone – “Enrico” in LUCIA DI LAMMERMOOR

Bryan Hymel, tenor – “Edgardo” in LUCIA DI LAMMERMOOR

Shawn Mathey, tenor – “Tamino” in THE MAGIC FLUTE

Elena Mosuc, soprano – “Lucia” in LUCIA DI LAMMERMOOR

Laurent Naouri, baritone – “Germont” in LA TRAVIATA

Myrtò Papatanasiu, soprano – “Violetta” in LA TRAVIATA

Jukka Rasilainen, baritone -- “Kurwenal” in TRISTAN & ISOLDE

Kristinn Sigmundsson, bass – “King Marke” in TRISTAN & ISOLDE

L’ubica Vargicova, soprano – “Queen of the Night” in THE MAGIC FLUTE

~~~~

The Maria Callas Debut Artist of the Year Award was launched during the 1991-1992 Dallas Opera Season.

Sharon Sweet was the first recipient for her impressive performance in the title role of Aida.  The list of subsequent winners reads like an opera’s “Who’s Who” from Cecilia Bartoli, Mary Dunleavy, Elizabeth Futral, Hei-Kyung Hong, Denyce Graves, Indira Mahajan, Mary Mills, Patricia Racette, Latonia Moore, Christopher Ventris, Catherine Naglestad, James Valenti, and Ben Heppner, to last year’s winner, Texas Born Soprano Laura Claycomb (Gilda in Verdi’s Rigoletto).

~~~~

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION ABOUT “MAY AT THE DALLAS OPERA”

IS CONVENIENTLY AVAILABLE ONLINE, 24/7

VISIT WWW.DALLASOPERA.ORG AND CHECK THE CALENDAR LISTINGS

For high-resolution, digital photographs suitable for print

To arrange an interview

Or for additional information

Please contact Suzanne Calvin, Manager/Director Media & PR

214.443.1014 or suzanne.calvin@dallasopera.org

THE DALLAS OPERA WISHES TO EXPRESS ITS GRATITUDE TO OUR EXCLUSIVE PARTNERS:

 

AMERICAN AIRLINES – OFFICIAL AIRLINE OF THEDALLAS OPERA

LEXUS – OFFICIAL VEHICLE OF THEDALLAS OPERA

CARTIER – OFFICIAL JEWELER & WATCHMAKER OF THEDALLAS OPERA

ROSEWOOD CRESCENT HOTEL – OFFICIAL HOTEL OF THE DALLAS OPERA

 

Ticket Information for the 2012-2013 Dallas Opera Season

  

            All performances are in the new Margot and Bill Winspear Opera House at the AT&T Performing Arts Center. Subscriptions start at just $75 and are on sale now.  For more information, contact The Dallas Opera Ticket Services Office at 214.443.1000 or visit us online at www.dallasopera.org.

THE DALLAS OPERA 2012-2013 SEASON INFORMATION

The Dallas Opera celebrates its Fifty-SixthInternational Season in the Margot and Bill Winspear Opera House at the AT&T Performing Arts Center in downtown Dallas. Evening performances will begin at 7:30 p.m. and Sunday matinees will begin at 2:00 p.m.   English translations will be projected above the stage at every performance.  Assistance is available for the hearing impaired.

AIDA by Giuseppe Verdi

Verdi’s Complex and Intimate Love Story Set in Spectacular Ancient Egypt!

October 26, 28(m), 31, November 3, 9, 11(m), 2012

An opera in four acts first performed at Khedivial Opera House, Cairo on December 24, 1871.

Text by Antonio Ghislanzoni, based on a scenario written by French Egyptologist Auguste Mariette.

Time: Old Kingdom

Place: Egypt

Conductor: Graeme Jenkins

Stage Director: John Copley

Costume Design: Peter J. Hall

Lighting Design: TBD

Wig & make-up Design: David Zimmerman

Chorus Master: Alexander Rom

Starring: Latonia Moore (Aida), Antonello Palombi (Radames), Nadia Krasteva* (Amneris), Lester Lynch (Amonasro), Orlin Anastassov* (Ramfis), Ben Wager (The King of Egypt), Jonathan Yarrington* (Messenger), and NaGuanda Nobles* (Priestess).

TURANDOT by Giacomo Puccini

April 5, 7(m), 10, 13, 19 & 21(m), 2013

Puccini’s Last Masterpiece—Riddled with Passionate Romance and Unforgettable Music!

An opera in three acts first performed in Milan at La Scala, April 25, 1926

Text by Giuseppe Adami and Renato Simoni, based on Carlo Gozzi’s fable, Turandot.

Time: Legendary times

Place: Peking, China

Conductor: Marco Zambelli

Stage Director: Garnett Bruce

Production Design: Allen Charles Klein

Lighting Design: TBD

Wig & make-up Design: David Zimmerman

Chorus Master: Alexander Rom

Starring: Lise Lindstrom* (Princess Turandot), Antonello Palombi (Calaf), Hei-Kyung Hong (Liu), Christian Van Horn* (Timur), Jonathan Beyer (Ping), Joseph Hu (Pang), Daniel Montenegrio* (Pong), Ryan Kuster* (A Mandarin), Steven Haal (Emperor Altoum).

THE ASPERN PAPERS by Dominick Argento

April 12, 14(m), 17, 20, 28(m), 2013

The Games People Play—Both Young and Old—To Achieve Their Twisted Desires!

An opera in two acts first performed in Dallas, November 19, 1988.

Text by Dominick Argento based on Henry James’ short novel.

Time: Legendary

Place: Venice, Italy

Conductor: Graeme Jenkins

Stage Director: Tim Albery

Scenic Design: Andrew Lieberman*

Costume Design: Constance Hoffman*

Lighting Design: Thomas Hase

Wig & make-up Design: David Zimmerman

Assistant Director: Michael Mori

Starring: Susan Graham* (Tina), Nathan Gunn (The Lodger), Joseph Kaiser* (Aspern), Dean Peterson (Barelli), Sasha Cooke* (Sonia), Eric Jordan* (A painter), Jennifer Youngs* (Olimpia).

*DallasOpera Debut

** American Debut

______________________________________________________________________________________

The Dallas Opera is supported, in part, by funds from:  City of Dallas, Office of Cultural Affairs; TACA; the Texas Commission on the Arts and The National Endowment for the Arts (NEA)American Airlines is the official airline of The Dallas Opera.  Lexus is the official vehicle of The Dallas Opera.  Cartier is the official jeweler and watchmaker of The Dallas Opera.  Rosewood Crescent Hotel is the official hotel of The Dallas Opera.  Advertising support from The Dallas Morning News.  The T. Boone Pickens YMCA, Smartwater and Stephen Pyles Restaurant--supporting partners.  A special thanks to Mrs. William W. Winspear and the Elsa von Seggern Foundation for their continuing support.

###

Everyone Pines for Ava

by Suzanne Calvin

 

Yes, everybody pines for Ava and, as the old saying goes: “What’s not to love?”

Terrific piece on soprano Ava Pine, our spunky Pamina in the season finale of Mozart’s THE MAGIC FLUTE now stepping into the limelight at the Fort Worth Opera Festival, from Jerome Weeks, a reporter/producer for KERA and the “Art and Seek” blog--read it right here.

Suzanne Calvin, Manager/Director Media & PR

Climb Every Opera

by Suzanne Calvin

The word that the Dallas Opera has commissioned British composer Joby Talbot and American librettist Gene Scheer to tackle the world’s highest peak, metaphorically speaking, is eliciting a variety of reactions. “The Dallas Observer” writes that the still-to-be-created opera EVEREST, slated for production in February of 2015, is our “most adventurous commission to date.” Read Katie Womack’s report on the “effortlessly witty, charming, and cool” Mr. Talbot -- right here.

D Magazine Arts Editor Peter Simek, who moderated yesterday evening’s “Composing Conversation” with Talbot and Gene Scheer, recaps the discussion here.

While over at “Theater Jones,” music critic Gregory Sullivan Isaacs opened with a strong note of approval (or, I think it was approval), saying: “The Dallas Opera continues to astound.”  Catch Gregory’s entire piece here.

There’s a lot of musical and theatrical terrain to cover between now and 2015 but I already have the feeling this project is in the best of hands.

UPDATE: Crewmantle at COMMANDOpera asks “How long will it run?” 

Answer: For several performances, at the very least.  What?  That’s not when he meant?  Read Crew’s comments here.

(Photo of Everest summit courtesy of smugmug)

Suzanne Calvin, Manager/Director Media & PR

The Dallas Opera Is Proud to Announce A Major New Commission

by Megan Meister

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:

Tuesday, May 15, 2012

Contact: Suzanne Calvin (214.443.1014/suzanne.calvin@dallasopera.org)

Or Megan Meister (214.443.1071/megan.meister@dallasopera.org)

                                                           

The Dallas Opera Is Proud to Announce

A Major New Commission:

CELEBRATED BRITISH COMPOSER JOBY TALBOT AND ACCLAIMED LIBRETTIST GENE SCHEER TEAM FOR

THE FIRST TIME TO CREATE A MOVING ONE-ACT, TDO WORLD PREMIERE—BASED ON A TRUE STORY!

~~~~

EVEREST

TAKING DALLAS BY STORM IN FEBRUARY 2015

~~~~

New Commission Announced This Evening at the Dallas Opera’s Latest “Composing Conversation,” Focused on the Work of Joby Talbot

            DALLAS, MAY 15, 2012 – The Dallas Opera is tremendously proud to announce the commissioning of a new original one-act opera by renowned British composer Joby Talbot (Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland and The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy) and the critically acclaimed American librettist Gene Scheer (Moby-Dick, Cold Mountain) in their first joint project.

EVEREST is expected to command center stage in the Margot and Bill Winspear Opera House at the AT&T Performing Arts Center in February of 2015 (cast and specific dates to be announced at a later time).

This new commission, the first since the company announced that composer Jake Heggie and librettist Terrence McNally are at work on Great Scott, a rapid-fire new comedy slated to open the Dallas Opera’s 2015-2016 Season, will become the fifth world premiere work commissioned by the Dallas Opera for the new millenium: Thérèse Raquin, Moby-Dick, A Question of Light (song cycle in partnership with the Dallas Museum of Art) Great Scott, and now, Everest.

Based on a harrowing 1996 expedition (the subject of two films and at least five books thus far) to summit the world’s tallest mountain peak.  Everest will blend documented facts and contemporary recollections of the transformative journey experienced by Everest survivors, with flights of the imagination designed to keep audience members transfixed in this harshly beautiful place at the top of the world.

This project will mark composer Joby Talbot’s first foray into opera, after establishing himself as a significant composer of original works for the recording studio, stage and screen.  Among his best-known composition are the rapturously received ballet Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland (2011) commissioned by the Royal Ballet, Covent Garden and the National Ballet of Canada, and original film and British television scores including The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy, based on the iconic science fiction of the late Douglas Adams, who also contributed the screenplay for the 2005 release.

“We thought it was vitally important to the success of this project to encourage Mr. Talbot to find a librettist with vast operatic experience and a collegial temperament,” explains Dallas Opera Artistic Director Jonathan Pell, who announced the new commission earlier this evening.  “Gene Scheer, who has worked with us on several important commissions in recent years, immediately sprang to mind.  We arranged for them to meet in Toronto and then again in New York,” Pell added, “and the composer and librettist evidently hit it off at once.”

“I’ve been intrigued by the idea of Joby Talbot composing for the opera stage since experiencing his brilliant work on Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland,” says Dallas Opera General Director and CEO Keith Cerny.  “I was fortunate enough to attend the premiere, which made a strong impression on me.  It was clear that Joby’s score supported the ballet magnificently as it progressed through a wide range of scenes, characters, and stage effects.  I found myself taking a serious interest in his body of work and quickly realized that this was a composer ‘without borders’; who had proven successes in film, ballet, choral writing, chamber music, orchestral writing, and many other genres—so, why not opera?

“And it goes without saying,” Mr. Cerny added, “that I’ve been in awe of Gene Scheer’s tremendous abilities as both a lyricist and librettist—whether capturing the essence of an American classic like Melville’s Moby-Dick for a 21st century audience, or creating the beautiful poetic language that flowed throughout our world premiere song cycle, A Question of Light—from the moment I arrived here in Dallas.

“We wouldn’t be enlisting Gene’s services for the fourth time if he didn’t have something very special to bring to the table.”

Composer Joby Talbot and Librettist Gene Scheer were on-hand for the announcement this evening in Nancy B. Hamon Hall.  Work on the project will commence later this summer.  Mr. Scheer is currently crafting the libretto for the 2015 Santa Fe Opera world premiere of Jennifer Higdon’s opera, Cold Mountain, based on the best-selling 1997 Civil War novel by Charles Frazier, which won the National Book Award for Fiction and became an Academy Award winning film.

“I am thrilled to be working with Joby Talbot on this exciting new project for the Dallas opera,” says librettist Gene Scheer.  “About a year ago, Jonathan Pell, the artistic director of the Dallas Opera, arranged for me to see Joby’s stunning ballet based on ‘Alice in Wonderland’ in Toronto.  In addition to being so impressed with the brilliance of the score, Joby and I got to spend quite a bit of time together.  With each conversation it became more and more clear that Joby is someone who, in addition to his great musical gifts, has keen theatrical instincts and that an opportunity to collaborate with him would be a privilege indeed.

“As we discussed a number of subjects, the idea of doing a piece about the people who experienced the tragedy on Mount Everest in 1996 sparked both of our imaginations. The story, which captured the world’s attention when it happened, offers a wonderful chance for music to explore aspects of the human spirit.  There is clearly one common theme that emerges from the stories of those who endured that storm over Everest.  They all felt that their lives were profoundly changed by the tragedy and by the acts of heartbreaking heroism and love that they all experienced on the top of the world.”

Adds Mr. Scheer: “I look forward to working with Joby to find ways to illuminate those transformations and to bring this thrilling story to the Dallas opera.”

A similar sentiment was echoed by the composer, Joby Talbot, who writes: “I am enormously excited at the prospect of working with Gene Scheer and the Dallas Opera on Everest.  I have been keen to write an opera for some years now.  Many of my recent projects have been narrative pieces and I’ve found that I very much enjoy the challenge of communicating a story through music.  In its breadth of scale and emotional drama, Everest seems to have all the ingredients for a wonderful collaboration.”

~~~~

            Full season subscriptions are now on sale (three performances) for the 2012-2013 “Pursuits of Passion” Season range from $75 to $1,020 through the Dallas Opera Ticket Services Office at 214.443.1000 or online at www.dallasopera.org.  Single tickets will become available September 10thStudent Rush best-available tickets are available for $25 (one per valid Student I.D.) at the Winspear box office, ninety minutes prior to each performance.  Inner Circle seating may be higher.

~~~~

KEY BIOS:

JOBY TALBOT (Composer)

Joby Talbot’s compositional aesthetic threads through his classical and concert works; scores for film and television; and collaborations with major contemporary choreographers.

Talbot studied composition privately with Brian Dennis and Brian Elias, prior to receiving tuition from Simon Bainbridge at the Guildhall School of Music and Drama. A 1997 commission from the BBC Philharmonic resulted in Luminescence for string orchestra, quickly followed by the percussion and chamber ensemble piece Incandescence, initially written for the Brunel Ensemble and toured in 1999 by Evelyn Glennie and the London Sinfonietta, for whom Talbot went on to write Minus 1500 in 2001. Talbot’s first work for the BBC Proms was 2002’s à cappella The Wishing Tree for The Kings’ Singers; subsequently, the Proms commissioned Sneaker Wave (2004) for the BBC National Orchestra of Wales, and an arrangement of Purcell’s Chacony in G Minor (2011) for the BBC Symphony Orchestra.

In 2004, Talbot was named Classic FM’s first Composer In Residence, a project that culminated in the 2005 release of the album Once Around the Sun. Also in 2005, Nigel Short’s exceptional choral ensemble Tenebrae premiered Path Of Miracles, another à cappella work of four movements, which describes the ancient Christian pilgrimage across northern Spain from Roncesvalles to Santiago de Compostela. In 2006, Talbot completed the trumpet concerto Desolation Wilderness for the Royal Liverpool Philharmonic and Turku Philharmonic orchestras, conducted by JoAnn Falletta and performed by acclaimed soloist Alison Balsom. The piece received its North American premiere, by former Chicago Symphony principal Craig Morris, in August 2009 at the Cabrillo Festival of Contemporary Music.

Works for smaller ensembles have included Blue Cell for the Apollo Sax Quartet; Mandala for six harps; Motion Detector for cellist Maya Beiser; and Manual Override for the T’ang Quartet.

The latter two pieces, along with a further two of Talbot’s, were chosen by The Royal Ballet resident choreographer Wayne McGregor for his 2008 work Entity with Random Dance, of which there have been over 85 performances worldwide. Talbot and McGregor had collaborated previously on Chroma for The Royal Ballet, which garnered the South Bank Show Award for Dance and an Olivier Award for Best New Dance Production, and has since been staged by several companies internationally; and, in the same year, on Genus for the Paris Opera Ballet, for which Talbot produced an electro-acoustic score in collaboration with LA electronic music producer Deru.

For a third 2008 dance collaboration, with Carolyn Carlson and the Orchestra National de Lille, Talbot wrote the full-length Tide Harmonic, now available on Signum Classics. In 2007 and 2008, Talbot’s The Dying Swan was choreographed by Christopher Wheeldon for Fool’s Paradise and performed by Wheeldon’s company Morphoses at Sadler’s Wells and NY City Center in successive seasons. In February 2011, Wheeldon and Talbot premiered their full-length ballet of Lewis Carroll’s Alice’s Adventures In Wonderland for The Royal Ballet and The National Ballet of Canada, the score for which was the first of its kind to be commissioned by the former company in 20 years.

Talbot’s work for film and television began in 1998 with his theme and score for British comedy series The League of Gentlemen, for which he was awarded the Royal Television Society Award for Best Title Music. In 2005 he scored the feature-length The League of Gentlemen’s Apocalypse, as well as The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy directed by Garth Jennings, with whom he subsequently worked on the 2008 film Son of Rambow. Other recent film scores include Penelope, Franklyn and Is Anybody There?, and during 2010-11, Talbot both scored and developed song arrangements with the young musicians in the recently released British independent film Hunky Dory.

Commissions from the British Film Institute, for silent films The Lodger (1999), premiered at the Edinburgh Festival, and The Dying Swan (2001) have been widely performed and adapted to other purposes.

As an arranger, Talbot has worked with numerous contemporary pop musicians, including Paul McCartney, Tom Jones, Air, Charlotte Gainsbourg, Neil Hannon and The Divine Comedy, Travis, and Ute Lemper, and with record producer Nigel Godrich. Talbot himself acted as producer as well as arranger on the XL Recordings album Aluminium, a limited-edition collection of songs by The White Stripes, arranged by Talbot for chamber orchestra.     http://www.jobytalbot.com

GENE SCHEER (Librettist)

Gene Scheer’s work is noted for its scope and versatility, and his music and lyrics have gained enthusiastic admirers among a broad audience.  Mr. Scheer has collaborated with the composer Jake Heggie on a number of different projects, including the critically acclaimed 2010 Dallas Opera world premiere, Moby-Dick, starring Ben Heppner as Captain Ahab; Three Decembers (Houston Grand Opera), which starred Frederica von Stade; and the lyric drama To Hell and Back (Philharmonia Baroque Orchestra), which featured Patti Lupone.  Other works by Scheer and Heggie include a number of song cycles as well as For a Look or a Touch, a 45-minute lyric drama written for baritone, actor, and chamber ensemble.

Mr. Scheer worked as librettist with Tobias Picker on An American Tragedy, which premiered at the Metropolitan Opera in 2005.  Their first opera, Thérèse Raquin, written for the Dallas Opera in 2001, was subsequently performed in Montreal (in a French translation), in San Diego, and at the Linbury Theater in Covent Garden in London.  The recording was cited by Opera News as one of the ten best recordings of 2002.

Other recent collaborations include the lyrics for Wynton Marsalis’s It Never Goes Away, featured in Mr. Marsalis’s work Congo Square.  With the composer Steven Stucky, Mr. Scheer wrote the oratorio August 4, 1964.  The work was premiered by the Dallas Symphony Orchestra in 2008 and was recently performed again by the orchestra, with Jaap van Zweden conducting, at Carnegie Hall during the inaugural “Spring for Music” festival.

Also a composer in his own right, Mr. Scheer has written a number of songs for singers such as Renée Fleming, Sylvia McNair, Stephanie Blythe, Jennifer Larmore, Denyce Graves, and Nathan Gunn.  The distinguished documentary filmmaker, Ken Burns, prominently featured Mr. Scheer’s song “American Anthem” (as sung by Norah Jones) in his Emmy Award-winning World War II documentary for PBS, “The War”.

In recent seasons, a number of new chamber works with music by Jake Heggie and lyrics by Mr. Scheer have taken centerstage.  These works include a piece, commissioned by the Houston Grand Opera, to commemorate the anniversary of 9/11, and a lyric drama for Seattle’s “Music of Remembrance” about Krystyna Zywulska, an Auschwitz survivor, and the song cycle, A Question of Light, commissioned by the Dallas Opera in partnership with the Dallas Museum of Art.  In February 2012, the Alexander Quartet and Joyce DiDonato premiered Camille Claudel: Into the Fire.  This new work by Heggie and Scheer, is based on the passionate life of French sculptor Camille Claudel.

Scheer is currently at work with composer Jennifer Higdon on an operatic adaptation of the National Book Award winning novel Cold Mountain for the Santa Fe Opera. http://www.genescheer.com

 

~~~~

 

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION ABOUT “MAY AT THE DALLAS OPERA”

IS CONVENIENTLY AVAILABLE ONLINE, 24/7

VISIT WWW.DALLASOPERA.ORG AND CHECK THE CALENDAR LISTINGS

For high-resolution, digital photographs suitable for print

To arrange an interview

Or for additional information

Please contact Suzanne Calvin, Manager/Director Media & PR

214.443.1014 or suzanne.calvin@dallasopera.org

THE DALLAS OPERA WISHES TO EXPRESS ITS GRATITUDE TO OUR EXCLUSIVE PARTNERS:

 

AMERICAN AIRLINES – OFFICIAL AIRLINE OF THE DALLAS OPERA

LEXUS – OFFICIAL VEHICLE OF THE DALLAS OPERA

CARTIER – OFFICIAL JEWELER & WATCHMAKER OF THE DALLAS OPERA

ROSEWOOD CRESCENT HOTEL – OFFICIAL HOTEL OF THE DALLAS OPERA

 

Ticket Information for the 2012-2013 Dallas Opera Season

  

            All performances are in the new Margot and Bill Winspear Opera House at the AT&T Performing Arts Center. Subscriptions start at just $75 and are on sale now.  For more information, contact The Dallas Opera Ticket Services Office at 214.443.1000 or visit us online at www.dallasopera.org.

THE DALLAS OPERA 2012-2013 SEASON INFORMATION

The Dallas Opera celebrates its Fifty-SixthInternational Season in the Margot and Bill Winspear Opera House at the AT&T Performing Arts Center in downtown Dallas. Evening performances will begin at 7:30 p.m. and Sunday matinees will begin at 2:00 p.m.   English translations will be projected above the stage at every performance.  Assistance is available for the hearing impaired.

AIDA by Giuseppe Verdi

October 26, 28(m), 31, November 3, 9, 11(m), 2012

Verdi’s Complex and Intimate Love Story Set in Spectacular Ancient Egypt!

An opera in four acts first performed at Khedivial Opera House, Cairo on December 24, 1871.

Text by Antonio Ghislanzoni, based on a scenario written by French Egyptologist Auguste Mariette.

Time: Old Kingdom

Place: Egypt

Conductor: Graeme Jenkins

Stage Director: John Copley

Costume Design: Peter J. Hall

Lighting Design: TBD

Wig & make-up Design: David Zimmerman

Chorus Master: Alexander Rom

Starring: Latonia Moore (Aida), Antonello Palombi (Radames), Nadia Krasteva* (Amneris), Lester Lynch (Amonasro), Orlin Anastassov* (Ramfis), Ben Wager (The King of Egypt), Jonathan Yarrington* (Messenger), and NaGuanda Nobles* (Priestess).

TURANDOT by Giacomo Puccini

April 5, 7(m), 10, 13, 19 & 21(m), 2013

Puccini’s Last Masterpiece—Riddled with Passionate Romance and Unforgettable Music!

An opera in three acts first performed in Milan at La Scala, April 25, 1926

Text by Giuseppe Adami and Renato Simoni, based on Carlo Gozzi’s fable, Turandot.

Time: Legendary times

Place: Peking, China

Conductor: Marco Zambelli

Stage Director: Garnett Bruce

Production Design: Allen Charles Klein

Lighting Design: TBD

Wig & make-up Design: David Zimmerman

Chorus Master: Alexander Rom

Starring: Lise Lindstrom* (Princess Turandot), Antonello Palombi (Calaf), Hei-Kyung Hong (Liu), Christian Van Horn* (Timur), Jonathan Beyer (Ping), Joseph Hu (Pang), Daniel Montenegrio* (Pong), Ryan Kuster* (A Mandarin), Steven Haal (Emperor Altoum).

THE ASPERN PAPERS by Dominick Argento

April 12, 14(m), 17, 20, 28(m), 2013

The Games People Play—Both Young and Old—To Achieve Their Twisted Desires!

An opera in two acts first performed in Dallas, November 19, 1988.

Text by Dominick Argento, based on Henry James novel.

Time: Legendary

Place: Venice, Italy

Conductor: Graeme Jenkins

Stage Director: Tim Albery

Scenic Design: Andrew Lieberman*

Costume Design: Constance Hoffman*

Lighting Design: Thomas Hase

Wig & make-up Design: David Zimmerman

Assistant Director: Michael Mori

Starring: Susan Graham* (Tina), Nathan Gunn (The Lodger), Joseph Kaiser* (Aspern), Dean Peterson (Barelli), Sasha Cooke* (Sonia), Eric Jordan* (A painter), Jennifer Youngs* (Olimpia).

*DallasOpera Debut

** American Debut

______________________________________________________________________________________

The Dallas Opera is supported, in part, by funds from:  City of Dallas, Office of Cultural Affairs; TACA; the Texas Commission on the Arts and The National Endowment for the Arts (NEA)American Airlines is the official airline of The Dallas Opera.  Lexus is the official vehicle of The Dallas Opera.  Cartier is the official jeweler and watchmaker of The Dallas Opera.  Rosewood Crescent Hotel is the official hotel of The Dallas Opera.  Advertising support from The Dallas Morning News.  The T. Boone Pickens YMCA, Smartwater and Stephen Pyles Restaurant--supporting partners.  A special thanks to Mrs. William W. Winspear and the Elsa von Seggern Foundation for their continuing support.

###

 

Rollin’ Down the River

by Suzanne Calvin

New at “Theater Jones”: the latest edition of Keith Cerny’s “Off the Cuff.” The Dallas Opera General Director and CEO takes this opportunity to explore why the placement of pieces in musical time matters. Read it right here.

(Photo of Ganges River delta courtesy of loc.gov)

Suzanne Calvin, Manager/Director Media and PR

From the Desk of Artistic Director Jonathan Pell

by Megan Meister

After the matinee on Sunday of Handel’s SEMELE, bizarrely, but not unattractively transported to ancient China, and wonderfully well sung by Jane Archibald and Bill Burden, I had a full day of auditions on Monday.

Among the group of established and distinguished Canadian singers who sang for me, there were also some younger singers who were new to me.  Although I didn’t have any specific roles in mind for any of them, it is great to add them to my data base.  I never know when one of them might be needed!

It was particularly lovely to hear soprano Nathalie Paulin again.  Nathalie has sung in Dallas Opera productions of CARMEN, THE MAGIC FLUTE, THE CUNNING LITTLE VIXEN, MANON and THE MERRY WIDOW, and it was wonderful to hear her again and see how much she has grown as an artist.

Last night I saw a production of Offenbach’s THE TALES OF HOFFMANN, with a mostly Canadian cast headed up by Bass John Relyea, with Erin Wall as “Antonia.”  Erin is a former winner of the Dallas Opera Guild Vocal Competition, and some of you may have heard her in Santa Fe as ALL the heroines in HOFFMANN two summers ago.  She returns there this year in the title role of Strauss’s ARABELLA, in a new production directed by Tim Albery, who will be in Dallas next season to stage THE ASPERN PAPERS.

The opera world is really quite small and everything and everyone are interconnected!

3 Questions for Keith from Harlan Crow

by Suzanne Calvin

In our continuing series, interesting people from the North Texas community are invited to pose three opera-related questions for Dallas Opera General Director and CEO Keith Cerny. The latest to take us up on the offer is Mr. Harlan Crow of Crow Holdings:

1. It is my understanding that the opera normally starts at 8:00 p.m. That is a difficult time for many people, particularly people that would like to introduce their families to the opera. Why can’t some presentations start earlier, resulting in an earlier opera evening?

The question of when to begin operas is an important one, and is often the subject of extensive market research. At The Dallas Opera, we typically begin our performances at 7:30 p.m., so that we can have everyone out of the theater well before 11:00 p.m. even for a moderately long opera. Some classic operas, such as Richard Strauss’s Salome, are relatively short (under two hours), and some contemporary operas are also around that length (such as Moby-Dick). With a start time of 7:30 p.m., the whole evening then finishes before 10:00 p.m. For our recent production of Wagner’s Tristan und Isolde, we began the evening performances at 7:00 p.m., which allowed people to get home at a more reasonable hour than if we held rigidly to our usual start time. At the recent performance I attended of Wagner’s Siegfried at the Met, the mid-week performance began at 6:00 p.m. One challenge with tinkering with start times is that it always creates a certain amount of patron confusion, as they try to sort through which performances start at an unusual time.

Lyric Opera of Chicago, well-known for its devoted subscriber base and marketing prowess, offers some Wednesday and Thursday matinee performances at 2:00 p.m. These mid-week matinees have proven very popular with commuters, as they can attend an opera during the week without having to make a special trip on the weekend from the suburbs. As The Dallas Opera begins to grow its number of performances and productions in the future, we may also test such an idea.

2. At the risk of heresy to purists, why can’t an operatic presentation be abbreviated? A good solid 1-1/2 hour show would create a rewarding experience without such a lengthy commitment to an evening.

Relative to the symphonic world, opera faces two programming challenges. The first is that with rare exceptions, one opera is presented in an evening (excluding such standards as the double bill of Mascagni’s Cavalleria Rusticana and Leoncavallo’s I Pagliacci or Puccini’s Il Trittico, which includes 3 one-act operas in an evening). In the symphonic world, most -- but not all -- programs include several different works, which lowers the perceived risk of patrons in attending. They know that if the first piece is not to their liking, they will get to hear something else in the same evening. The second challenge is that many wonderful operas are very long for today’s audiences. As a result, they are already cut quite considerably. This is particularly true for such famous Mozart operas as Così fan Tutte or The Marriage of Figaro, but many other operas are cut. (For example, we made careful cuts in last year’s presentation of Donizetti’s Anna Bolena). With the near-universal adoption of supertitles (showing the English language translation of the opera on a small screen above the stage) and increasing improvements in large-scale projection technology, one can imagine presenting key scenes of an opera and then providing detailed text describing what events took place in between. This approach would allow the audience to hear significant parts of the opera, and to maintain the dramatic thread, in a much shorter span of time. It might be difficult to cut the whole opera down to 1-1/2 hours, unless the performance was presented without intermission, but performances of 2-2.5 hours would be feasible. Such an approach would not save much on production costs, but it might be an effective way to draw new audiences. I have already held informal discussions with the General Director of another leading U.S. opera company about piloting such an approach at some point in the future. Naturally, we would need to market these abbreviated operas quite differently, to eliminate the risk of patron confusion.

3. Again, at the risk of heresy, what about an operatic “greatest hits” night? The talent, costumes and sets, of course, would be difficult but the hope of drawing a new and younger audience might be worth it.

There is nothing heretical about an operatic “greatest hits” evening, and it is an idea that we would like to consider for TDO at some point. Evenings of operatic excerpts, especially famous opera choruses, regularly sell out in London, and some opera companies in the U.S. have had great success with gala-type events featuring famous singers in several extended excerpts over the course of an evening. These events also typically include sets and costumes. While the costs can be relatively high due to the need to include singers, sets, costumes and stage directors, they can make a significant “splash” and generate a lot of community interest.

 

Harlan Crow

Harlan Crow is the chairman and chief executive officer of Crow Family Holdings, a private family-business established to exclusively manage the capital of the Trammell Crow family. He assumed overall responsibilities for the family operations in 1988 after serving in other management positions. During Mr. Crow’s tenure as CEO, the firm has continued to grow and strengthen its position as a leader in the real estate investment business. The firm has also made important strategic diversifications into a whole variety of additional asset classes. Mr. Crow is a director on several boards including the American Enterprise Institute, the Southwestern Medical Foundation, the Supreme Court Historical Society Board and the Antiquarian Society. He also serves as honorary counsel of Denmark for the Southwest region.

(Photo courtesy of Crow Holdings)

From the Desk of Artistic Director Jonathan Pell

by Megan Meister

I arrived yesterday afternoon in Toronto for a Saturday performance that oddly began at 4:30 in the afternoon.  Apparently this is one of the Canadian Opera Company’s most popular subscription series, and I must confess that I like the idea of it starting late enough in the day to run my Saturday errands and still be out of the theatre in time for a nice dinner.  I wonder why more companies don’t do it ?

This was a new production of two one act operas written more or less at the same time—Zemlinsky’s A FLORENTINE TRAGEDY and Puccini’s GIANNI SCHICCHI.

The Zemlinsky is rarely done (in fact, I can’t recall a production since it was done in Santa Fe about thirty years ago) and I had never seen it, although I had heard it on a recording.

It is reminiscent of Strauss’s SALOME (and perhaps not coincidentally is also based on a short play by Oscar Wilde translated into German.)

It is an intriguing piece and deserves to be better known.

If a 4:30 matinee is uniquely Canadian, maybe that might explain something else I witnessed this morning which could be another unusual Canadian custom.

I couldn’t help but notice that the man at the next table from me at breakfast finished his eggs and was left with a plate of fried potatoes.  He then picked up the sugar shaker and poured what looked like half a cup of sugar on the potatoes and then poured ketchup over it and  proceeded to eat this bizarre concoction.

As Prince Orlofsky observes in DIE FLEDERMAUS, “Chacun a son gout.”

Today I go to a 2:00 matinee of a new production of Handel’s SEMELE and tomorrow I attend a performance of LES CONTES d’HOFFMANN after a full day of hearing auditions of some of Canada’s  best singers.

June at the Dallas Opera

by Megan Meister

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:

Wednesday, May 9, 2012

Contact: Suzanne Calvin (214.443.1014/suzanne.calvin@dallasopera.org)

Or Megan Meister (214.443.1071/megan.meister@dallasopera.org)

OUR CASUAL SUMMER EVENTS SERIES,

“BARITONES & BEACHBALLS” IS SOARING FOR

JUNE AT THE DALLAS OPERA

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            DALLAS, MAY 9, 2012 – The Dallas Opera is ready to make your summer one to remember as the temperatures start to heat up, beginning with this month’s edition of our casual summer events series, BARITONES & BEACHBALLS, brought to you by The Friends of the Dallas Opera.  Every event is either no-cost or low-cost, and the series includes timely discussions connected to our upcoming “Pursuits of Passion” Season.

            Our kickoff event of the summer on Tuesday, June 5 at 6:30 p.m. will be a timely lecture in partnership with WRR 101.1 FM on our first opera of the season, AIDA.  Dr. Stephen Dubberly will join TDO’s General Director & CEO Keith Cerny, and WRR 101.1 FM’s Kurt Rongey for this lively, in-depth discussion on one of Giuseppe Verdi’s timeless masterpieces, AIDA.  Other highlights for the month of June include special networking and social events, tempting tastings and cool, casual movie night in partnership with Dallas Film Society.

June also brings two great children activities to the month with a performance of Georges Bizet’s DOCTOR MIRACLE at the Dallas Children’s Theater on Sunday, June 10th at 3:00 p.m. and new to TDO campTDOcampTDO explores the world of John Davies’ operatic version of JACK AND THE BEANSTALK. Join the Dallas Opera for a 3-hour interactive discussion that gives campers a first-hand account of what it takes to create an opera production on Friday, June 22, 2012 starting at 9:00 a.m.

Most of these events are free (as in “absolutely, positively free!”).  However, tastings and Family Programming require a nominal fee to cover our costs.  More details in the calendar below or visit us at dallasopera.org/events.  Please note that RSVPs are recommended for all events.  Go to dallasopera.org/rsvp or call the RSVP hotline at 214.443.1000 to reserve your seat now.

 

2012 Calendar of Events

“Baritones & Beachballs”

The Dallas Opera’s Summer Events Series

Brought to you by Friends of the Dallas Opera

  1.) Tuesday, June 5, 2012

Lecture Series in partnership with WRR 101.1 FM.  “AIDA” Join the Dallas Opera’s General Director & CEO Keith Cerny, Dr. Stephen Dubberly, and WRR 101.1 FM’s Kurt Rongey for a lively, in-depth discussion about AIDA and the music of the Giuseppe Verdi.  See how AIDA fits into the upcoming TDO “Pursuits of Passion” Season and why this opera has stood the test of time.

Time: 6:30 PM

Location:  The Dee & Charles Wyly Theatre

6th Floor Patron Lounge

2400 Flora Street

Dallas, TX 75201

Cost: FREE.  RSVPs recommended, 214.443.1000.

2.) Saturday, June 9, 2012

“Inside the Dallas Opera” is our monthly Radio program on WRR 101.1 FM that takes you the listener backstage and behind-the-scenes for a look at timely issues and upcoming productions.  Hosted by TDOs Suzanne Calvin.

Time:   TBD

Location: WRR 101.1FM

3.) Sunday, June 10, 2012

“DOCTOR MIRACLE” by Bizet A hilarious, fully-staged one-act opera about a young man’s quest to marry his true love, the mayor’s daughter. He must disguise himself as a servant who makes a “poison” omelet, and as a doctor who saves the family — all for the sake of true love. Will the happy couple get married? Join TDO and find out.

Time: 3:00 PM

Location: Dallas Children’s Theater

5938 Skillman

Dallas, TX 75231

Cost: $5, 214.443.1000 or visit us at www.dallasopera.org/family

4.) Monday, June 11, 2012

The movie “Aida” from 1953 starring Sophia Loren as Aida (famous Soprano Renata Tebaldi singing the role of Aida) will get you ready for the opening opera of our “Pursuits of Passion” Season Verdi’s AIDA.  This movie screening in partnership with Dallas Film Society will transport you to this exotic land.

Time: 7:00 PM

Location:  Studio Movie Grill (Royal Ln. Location)

11170 N. Central Expressway

Dallas, TX 75243

Cost: FREE.  RSVPs required seating is limited, 214.443.1000.

5.) Tuesday, June 12, 2012

“Cheesy Opera Happy Hour” in partnership with Scardello Artisan Cheese: Savor wine and nosh on cheese selections hand-picked by Cheese Monger and owner Rich Rogers specifically chosen to pair with Verdi’s AIDA.

Time: 6:30 PM

Location:  Scardello Artisan Cheese Shop

3511 Oak Lawn

Dallas, TX 75219

Cost: $15 per person.  Reservations recommended, tasting is limited to 40 people, 214.443.1000.

6.) Wednesday, June 13, 2012

“Wine Wednesday” in partnership with Komali: “AIDA-Themed” Wine tasting. Join us on the patio -- weather permitting -- for a casual wine tasting. Chef/Owner Abraham Salum will hand-pick wines using the setting of Verdi’s AIDA as the inspiration. Sip, swirl, Savor! Small bites will be provided to enjoy with the wine.

Time: 6:30 PM

Location:  Komali Contemporary Mexican Cuisine

4152 Cole Ave, Suite 106

Dallas, TX 75204

Cost: $20 per person.  Reservations recommended, tasting is limited, 214.443.1000.

7.) Friday, June 15, 2012

“Late Night in the Arts District” Dallas Museum of Art: Verdi’s AIDA

Join TDO as they tour the DMA’s African collections and the special exhibition, Souvenir: A 19th-Century Carved Tusk from the Loango Coast of Africa with Roz Walker.  Along with this tour enjoy a lively lecture by Dr. Stephen Dubberly, excerpt performances of Verdi’s AIDA will be in focus, these are events not to be missed!

Time: 7:00 PM

Location:  Dallas Museum of Art

1717 North Harwood

Dallas, TX 75201

Cost: FREE for DMA Members. FREE with regular museum admission $10.

8.) Tuesday, June 19, 2012

“Brownbags@theopera” Join us in Sammons Park at the AT&T Performing Arts Center for a noontime recital featuring tenor Jonathan Yarrington making his Dallas Opera debut in Verdi AIDA this fall.

Time:   12:00 PM

Location:         Sammons Park

2403 Flora Street

Dallas, TX 75201

Cost:    Free

9.) Thursday, June 21, 2012

“Cooking@theOpera” The Dallas Opera goes to Central Market Plano for an extra-long interactive cooking demonstration based on the opera AIDA.  Get a sense of the food that creates the cultural backdrop for this Verdi masterpiece.  Enjoy food samples from a Surprise Guest Chef that you won’t want to miss!

Time: 7:00 PM

Location:  Central Market Plano

320 Coit Rd.

Plano, TX 75075

Featured Chef:  To Be Announced

Cost: $25.  RSVPs Advanced Purchase Required, 214.443.1000.

10.) Friday, June 22, 2012

“CampTDO”  Explore the world of John Davies’ operatic version of Jack and the Beanstalk at campTDO. Join the Dallas Opera for a 3-hour interactive discussion that gives campers a first-hand account of what it takes to create an opera production. Under the guidance of TDO teaching artists, campers will have a behind-the-scenes experience of what it takes to perform live opera. Each campTDO session will conclude with a fully-staged performance of Jack and the Beanstalk performed by TDO teaching artists.
Time:   9:00 AM

Location:         Karayanis Rehearsal Center

4301 S. Fitzhugh

Dallas, TX 75210

Cost: $25 per child, $20-TDO season subscribers
Buy on-line at: dallasopera.org/family/camptdo/ or call 214.443.1000.

EVENTS AND GUESTS SUBJECT TO CHANGE

 

~~~~

 

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION ABOUT “JUNE AT THE DALLAS OPERA”

IS CONVENIENTLY AVAILABLE ONLINE, 24/7

VISIT WWW.DALLASOPERA.ORG AND CHECK THE CALENDAR LISTINGS

For high-resolution, digital photographs suitable for print

To arrange an interview

Or for additional information

Please contact Suzanne Calvin, Manager/Director Media & PR

214.443.1014 or suzanne.calvin@dallasopera.org

 

THE DALLAS OPERA WISHES TO EXPRESS ITS GRATITUDE TO OUR EXCLUSIVE PARTNERS:

 

AMERICAN AIRLINES – OFFICIAL AIRLINE OF THE DALLAS OPERA

LEXUS – OFFICIAL VEHICLE OF THE DALLAS OPERA

CARTIER – OFFICIAL JEWELER & WATCHMAKER OF THE DALLAS OPERA

ROSEWOOD CRESCENT HOTEL – OFFICIAL HOTEL OF THE DALLAS OPERA

 

Ticket Information for the 2012-2013 Dallas Opera Season

  

            All performances are in the new Margot and Bill Winspear Opera House at the AT&T Performing Arts Center. Subscriptions start at just $75 and are on sale now.  For more information, contact The Dallas Opera Ticket Services Office at 214.443.1000 or visit us online at www.dallasopera.org.

 

 

THE DALLAS OPERA 2012-2013 SEASON INFORMATION

The Dallas Opera celebrates its Fifty-SixthInternational Season in the Margot and Bill Winspear Opera House at the AT&T Performing Arts Center in downtown Dallas. Evening performances will begin at 7:30 p.m. and Sunday matinees will begin at 2:00 p.m.   English translations will be projected above the stage at every performance.  Assistance is available for the hearing impaired.

 

AIDA by Giuseppe Verdi

October 26, 28(m), 31, November 3, 9, 11(m), 2012

Verdi’s Complex and Intimate Love Story Set in Spectacular Ancient Egypt!

An opera in four acts first performed at Khedivial Opera House, Cairo on December 24, 1871.

Text by Antonio Ghislanzoni, based on a scenario written by French Egyptologist Auguste Mariette.

Time: Old Kingdom

Place: Egypt

Conductor: Graeme Jenkins

Stage Director: John Copley

Costume Design: Peter J. Hall

Wig & make-up Design: David Zimmerman

Chorus Master: Alexander Rom

Starring: Latonia Moore (Aida), Antonello Palombi (Radames), Nadia Krasteva* (Amneris), Lester Lynch (Amonasro), Orlin Anastassov* (Ramfis), Ben Wager (The King of Egypt), Jonathan Yarrington* (Messenger), and NaGuanda Nobles* (Priestess).

 

 

TURANDOT by Giacomo Puccini

April 5, 7(m), 10, 13, 19 & 21(m), 2013

Puccini’s Last Masterpiece—Riddled with Passionate Romance and Unforgettable Music!

An opera in three acts first performed in Milan at La Scala, April 25, 1926

Text by Giuseppe Adami and Renato Simoni, based on Carlo Gozzi’s fable, Turandot.

Time: Legendary times

Place: Peking, China

Conductor: Marco Zambelli

Stage Director: Garnett Bruce

Production Design: Allen Charles Klein

Wig & make-up Design: David Zimmerman

Chorus Master: Alexander Rom

Starring: Lise Lindstrom* (Princess Turandot), Antonello Palombi (Calaf), Hei-Kyung Hong (Liu), Christian Van Horn* (Timur), Jonathan Beyer (Ping), Joseph Hu (Pang), Daniel Montenegrio* (Pong), Ryan Kuster* (A Mandarin), Steven Haal (Emperor Altoum).

 

THE ASPERN PAPERS by Dominick Argento

April 12, 14(m), 17, 20, 28(m), 2013

The Games People Play—Both Young and Old—To Achieve Their Twisted Desires!

An opera in two acts first performed in Dallas, November 19, 1988.

Text by Dominick Argento, based on Henry James novel.

Time: Legendary

Place: Venice, Italy

Conductor: Graeme Jenkins

Stage Director: Tim Albery

Scenic Design: Andrew Lieberman*

Costume Design: Constance Hoffman*

Lighting Design: Thomas Hase

Wig & make-up Design: David Zimmerman

Assistant Director: Michael Mori

Starring: Susan Graham* (Tina), Nathan Gunn (The Lodger), Joseph Kaiser* (Aspern), Dean Peterson (Barelli), Sasha Cooke* (Sonia), Eric Jordan* (A painter), Jennifer Youngs* (Olimpia).

 

*DallasOpera Debut

** American Debut

 

______________________________________________________________________________________

The Dallas Opera is supported, in part, by funds from:  City of Dallas, Office of Cultural Affairs; TACA; the Texas Commission on the Arts and The National Endowment for the Arts (NEA)American Airlines is the official airline of The Dallas Opera.  Lexus is the official vehicle of The Dallas Opera.  Cartier is the official jeweler and watchmaker of The Dallas Opera.  Rosewood Crescent Hotel is the official hotel of The Dallas Opera.  Advertising support from The Dallas Morning News.  The T. Boone Pickens YMCA, Smartwater and Stephen Pyles Restaurant--supporting partners.  A special thanks to Mrs. William W. Winspear and the Elsa von Seggern Foundation for their continuing support.

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